Various Artists Mutant Disco Vol.4

ALBUM ZE.LP31

Digipack CD
Digital MP3 
Digital FLAC

14 Tracks

Share on
  • DIGIPACK CD + MP3
    • - MP3 320 Kbps
    • - 14 Tracks
    • - Booklet
    € 8.40
    Shipping
    Add To Cart
  • DIGITAL / MP3 320 kbps
    • - 14 Tracks
    • - Digital Booklet
    € 8.99
    Download
    Add To Cart
  • DIGITAL / FLAC
    • - 14 Tracks
    • - 16 bit lossless
    • - Digital Booklet
    € 9.99
    Download
    Add To Cart
Media

THE LAST DANCE

During the summer of 1977, a cortisone puffed up Elvis was about to join up with his twin brother Jesse Caron, who let him carry the way too heavy title of King of Rock & Roll. In the mean time, in a New York where an historical heat wave was intensified by the surrounding paranoid atmosphere set up by the son of Sam, Michael Zilkha and myself where about to form ZE Records, well-resolved to break down the boundaries between the two sounds that we both grew up with: Rock & Roll and Rhythm & Blues.

Michael and I were brought together by our common love for the Velvet Underground. John Cale, with whom I was working as DA for his new label « Spy Records », introduced us, as Michael wanted to invest in Spy’s capital. Ultimately, we created our own label, at a time were rock was starting to go round in circles and, where, despite hysterical campaigns such as « Disco Sucks » or « Death to Disco », the fun acts were to be found in the Clubs.

Ten years earlier in the East Village, Andy Warhol, who’s flair is once again to be saluted, already breached by turning into a club what was at the time a ballroom for polish immigrants, « The Dom », located on Saint Mark’s Place. He was then broadcasting his movies and light shows over the resident band, the now cult Velvet Underground with Nico, Eddie Sedgwick, the whole Factory crowd: artists, downtown Bohemians, uptown filthy richs, models, transvestites and junkies were gathering around Warhol’s Exploding Plastic Evitable Show. Things were stirring it up and this mix of genres was about to become a winner. John Wilcock was then writing in the East Village Other:

« Art has come to the discotheque and it will never be the same again. »

In April 1977, Steve Rubbel and Ian Schrager already started to popularize this idea with the opening of the Studio 54, soon followed in September by Michael Brody with the Paradise Garage. The year after, Fabrice Emaer would do the same in Paris opening Le Palace, with the success we all know. However, in the end of 1977, a breaker called « Saturday Night Fever » was about to rush in New Yorkers’ screens, and about to shatter forever the nightlife of every single cities of our small planet. Within a few months, what was an underground trend predominantly bound to blacks, gays and a few hundreds hype socialites packed in front of the Studio 54, Paradise Garage or Xenon (for those drove back from the 54), was about to become a social and cultural phenomenon.

Much like the suburban kids, second generation of Brooklyn immigrants taking Manhattan by storm, blow-dried and rigged out with polyester shirts made of the living-room curtains, millions of working class heroes were about to establish Disco as an worldwide economic model for the following 30 years…

In 1978 and 1979, ZE Records released its first 12” singles and Lps; from « No Wave » with James Chance/White, Arto Lindsay, Mars, Lizzy Mercier Descloux or Lydia Lunch, to the birth of Electro with bands such as Suicide, or even « Mutant Disco » with Kid Creole, Don Armando, Aural Exciters, Gichy Dan Beachwood ≠ 9, Junie Morisson and Was (Not Was). Some kind of timeless Disco that we would describe as « Mutant » for our first vinyl compilation, back in 1981. August Darnell has been the first one to carry through this crossover ambition between Rock and Disco, with the now cult ReMix of James White’s « Contort Yourself ». Pseudo-brothers David and Don Was would add to their band the MC5 guitarist: Wayne Kramer, Charlie Mingus’ trumpet player: Marcus Belgrave, and Parliament/funkadelic’s percussionist Larry Fratangelo; standardizing thereby a musical pattern for generations of bands who’d then pleased dance floors around the world.

30 years after the release of the first vinyl inaugurating what we can now qualify a new « style ». The Mutant Disco, not really mainstream disco music, but like we subtitled it on the original album: « A subtle discolation of the norm », I can prounly said that all these titles which did not take a wrinkle, since inspired several generations of future wannabe behind their turntable or in their studios and made contorsionner thousands of clubbers on the dancefloors of the whole world. It was, even if we did not realy though about it at that time, certainly the goal!

Therefore, here is the fourth volume of the series, in a way, to come full circle with the Mutant Disco on ZE Records. 

In this latest opus, one can discover a ReMix version (Let’s go to bed) of Was Not Was’ « Shake your head», with Ozzy Osbourne and the lovely Kim Bassinger on the microphone; and a ReMix of the delirious « The Party Brooke Up », two tracks from their second album « Born to Laugh at Tornadoes ». An Optimo ReMix by Twitch – one of today’s best Dj – of the cult classic « Contort Yourself » by James White & The Blacks. Another ReMix by Australian’s Stiff Figure of the rather minimal « Herpes Simplex » by Rosa Yemen, Lizzy Mercier Descloux’s first musical incarnation from 1978. « No Turn On Red » by David Gamson, a future member of Scritty Politti never made it onto an official release on ZE, its only appearance as a cassette-only release on the second of NME’s influential early ’80s ‘Jive Wire’ compilations. Here is the Fat Camp Edit version from Paul Noble and Bill Brewster. There’s also an Arthur Baker legendary ReMix of « Tease Me » by the nonetheless legendary Funkadelic member Junie Morisson, of whom we are reissuing the 1984 debut album on ZE: « Evacuate Your Seat » later this year. On the rocker side, we have a mix of Alan Vega’s « Fireball » out of his debut album on ZE and « Action Man » by Gichy Dan’s Beachwood ≠9, of who we will also reissue the debut album this year. A ReMix by San Francisco based band TUSSLE, of Irving Berlin classic « I’m an Indian Too », on its Don Armando 2nd Av. Rhumba Band’s version (while their album « Deputy of Love » is also to be reissued on ZE in 2010). A Mutant Disco ReMix of Lizzy Mercier Descloux’s last track in 2003 « Hard-Boiled Babe ». Last a ReMix of Michael Dracula’s track « Destroy Yourself », originally recorded for their debut album on ZE,« In The Red ».

In 2010, Club Culture has never been so prolific, and will be standing for many years to come. We’re proud to have set a few trails in this direction, and thus, to have brought our contribution to it.

Michel Esteban Bahia, October 2009

 

LINER NOTES (FRENCH)

LA DERNIERE DANSE

Durant l'été 1977 à Memphis, Elvis bouffi à la cortisone allait rejoindre son jumeau Jesse Caron qui lui avait laissé seul porter le titre trop lourd de roi du Rock & Roll. Pendant qu'à New York qui connaît alors une canicule historique accentuée par la parano ambiante que fait régner le fils de Sam, Michael Zilkha et moi-même nous apprêtions à fonder ZE records bien décider à faire tomber les barrières entre les deux musiques qui avaient bercé notre adolescence : Le Rock et le Rhythm & Blues.

C’était notre amour du Velvet Underground qui nous avait rapprochés, Michael et moi.  John Cale avec qui je travaillais comme directeur artistique sur son nouveau label « Spy Records », nous avait présentés, car Michael voulait rentrer dans le capital de Spy. En fin de compte, nous avons lancé tous les deux, notre propre label ZE records. A cette époque le Rock tournait un peu en rond et malgré les hystériques campagnes « Disco Sucks » ou « Death to Disco », le fun, c’était bien dans les discothèques qu’on allait le trouver...

Dix ans plutôt, dans l’east Village, Andy Warhol, dont il faut une nouvelle fois saluer le flair, avait ouvert la brèche en transformant en Club le premier étage d’une salle de bal pour immigrés Polonais, « The Dom », situé sur Saint Mark’s Place. Projetant ses films et light shows sur le groupe qui animait les soirées, le désormais cultissime Velvel Underground avec Nico, Eddie Sedgwick, toute la faune de la Factory, artistes, downtown Bohemians et Uptown friqués, top models, travestis et junkies se réunissaient autour de l’ Exploding Plastic Evitable Show Warholien. La mayonnaise avait pris et ce mélange des genres allait faire recette. John Wilcock écrivait alors dans The East Village Other: 

« Art has come to the discotheque and it will never be the same again. » 

En avril 1977, Steve Rubbel et Ian Schrager avaient commencé à populariser ce concept en ouvrant le Studio 54, suivi par Michael Brody en septembre avec le Paradise Garage. L’année suivante Fabrice Emaer fera de même à Paris avec le Palace, avec le succès que l’on sait. Mais à la fin de l’année 77 une déferlante nommée « Saturday Night Fever » allait débarquer sur les écrans New Yorkais et bouleverser à tout jamais la vie nocturne de toutes les grandes villes de notre petite planète.  En l’espace de quelques mois, ce qui n’était qu’un mouvement underground réservé principalement aux noirs, aux gays et à quelques centaines de socialites branchées qui se bousculaient aux portes des : Studio 54, Paradise Garage ou Xenon (pour les refoulés du 54),  allait devenir un phénomène de société.

A l’image des banlieusards de Brooklyn brushingnés et accoutrés de chemises polyester taillées dans les rideaux du salon, à l'assaut de Manhattan, des millions de working class heroes allaient propulser la disco en modèle économique mondial pour les trente années à venir ....

En 1978 et 79 sortiront les premiers maxis et albums sur ZE records : de la « No Wave » avec James Chance / White, Arto Lindsay, Mars, Lizzy Mercier Descloux et Lydia Lunch, les début de l’électro avec Suicide et de la « Disco » avec Kid Creole, Don Armando, Aural Exciters, Gichi Dan, et Was (Not Was). Disco que nous qualifierons de « Mutant » sur notre première compilation en 1981. August Darnell sera le premier à faire faire le cross over entre Rock et Disco avec son remix désormais classique de « Contort Yourself » de James White.  Les faux frères David et Don Was eux allieront au sein de leur groupe le guitariste de MC5 : Wayne Kramer, Marcus Belgrave : le trompettiste de Charlie Mingus et Larry Fratangelo : le percussionniste de Parliament/ Funkadelic, standardisant ainsi un modèle étalon pour des générations de groupes qui font aujourd’hui le bonheur des Dance floors de la planète.

30 ans après la parution du premier vinyle inaugurant ce qu'on peut désormais qualifier de « style ». Le Mutant Disco, pas vraiment de la disco classique, mais comme nous l'avions sous-titré sur cet album original : « A subtle discolation of the norm », que l'on pourrait traduire par : Une subtile dislocation de la norme...  tous ces titres qui n'ont pas pris une ride, ont depuis inspiré plusieurs générations de futur wannabe derrière leurs platines ou dans leurs studios et fait se contorsionner des milliers de clubbers sur les pistes du monde entier. C'était, même si nous n'y pensions pas vraiment à l'époque, certainement le but !

Voici donc le quatrième volume de la série pour boucler la boucle des rééditions Mutant Disco sur ZE records.

Dans cette dernière livraison on peut trouver un Remix (Let's go to bed) de « Shake your Head » de Was (Not Was), avec Ozzy Osbourne et la délicieuse Kim Bassinger derrière le micro, ainsi qu'un Edit Remix du délirant « The Party Brooke Up », deux titres extraits de leur second album,  « Born to Laugh at Tornados ». Le Remix Optimo par Twitch, un des meilleurs dj actuel, du Cult Classic  « Contort Yourself » de James White & The Blacks. Un Remix par les australiens Stiff Figure du minimaliste « Herpex Simplex » de Rosa Yemen, la première incarnation (1978) discographique de Lizzy Mercier Descloux. « No Turn On Red » par David Gamson, futur membre de Scritty Politti n’avait jamais été publié sur un disque « officiel » ZE, le titre était juste sorti sur une cassette promo du magazine anglais NME. Vous trouverez ici sa version « Fat Camp Edit » par Paul Noble et Bill Brewster. Le Remix par le légendaire Arthur Baker du « Tease Me » de Junie Morrison, figure du non moins légendaire Funkadelic et dont nous rééditons pour l'occasion le premier album solo sur ZE en 1984 «  Evacuate Your Seats” . Une touche un peu plus « rock » avec l'Edit Mix de « Fireball » extrait du premier LP d'Alan Vega et du « Action Man » de Gichy Dan. Un Remix du groupe de San Francisco TUSSLE du classique d'Irving Berlin «  I'm an Indian Too », par Don Armando’s 2nd Av. Rhumba Band, dont nous rééditons également le premier album « Deputy of Love ». Un Remix de « Hard-Boiled Babe » le dernier morceau enregistré par Lizzy Mercier Descloux en 2003. Un remix des Garçons extrait de leur premier album « Divorce » enregistré par Bob Blank en 1979. Un Remix de Michael Dracula, « Destroy Yourself » extrait de son premier album « In The Red ».

En 2009 la Club Culture n'a jamais été aussi prolifique et a encore de beaux jours devant elle. Nous sommes fiers d'avoir ouvert quelques pistes et apporté notre petite pierre à cet édifice.

Michel Esteban 

Bahia,  Octobre 2009

digital Booklet LP31

Free Booklet

Download PDF Booklet

01 • WAS (NOT WAS) • Shake your Head Let’s Go to Bed ReMix • 5:31
Written by David Was / Don Was / Jarvis Strout) 
Published by Los Was Cosmipolitanos/State of the Arless/ Great Joy Music
Recorded at Sound Suite Recording Studios, Detroit
Featuring vocals by Kim Basinger  & Ozzy Osbourne
Produced by Don Was, David  Was & Jack Tann
Remixed by  Steve « Silk » Hurley
Original Sound Made by ZE Records © 1982

02 • TUSSLE • I’m an Indian Too Re / Deconstruction Mix • 7:17
Written by Irving Berlin • Published by Irving Berlin Music
Featuring Vocal by Fonda Rae • Originaly Mixed & Produced by August Darnell 
Arranged by  « Sugar Coated » Andy Hernandez
RE/Deconstruction Mix Produced by Tussle & Andrew Freid 
with additional production by Ben Cook
Recorded at Spark Productions, Emeryville, CA
Arranged and Mixed at 15pearl Studio, San Francisco, CA
Original Sound Made by ZE Records © 1979 & 2004 

03 • DAVID GAMSON • No Turn On Red Fat Camp Version Edit • 5:48
Composed By  D. Gamson & R. Gamson 
Additional Production & Edited by Fat Camp 
Re-edit Engineered by Paul Noble
Synthesizer & Stylophone Solo by Andy Rogers 
Producer by David Gamson 
Original Sound Made by ZE Records © 1979

04 • DON ARMANDO • Winter of Love Mutant Disco Edit • 6:17
Written by Don Armando • Published by Zem Sound / Don Armando Music
Recorded at Blank Tapes NYC
Produced by Andy « Coati Mundi » Hernandez
Original Sound Made by ZE Records © 1979

05 • AURAL EXCITERS • Marathon Runner • 6:23
Written by August Darnell / Andy Hernandez / Carlos Franzetti    
Published by Perennial August / Unichappell Music / Zem Sound
Recorded at Blank Tapes NYC
Produced by Bob Blank
Original Sound Made by ZE Records © 1979

06 • JUNIE MORRISON • Tease Me Arthur Baker ReMix • 7:01
Written by Walter Morrison    
Published by Island USA Music Inc / Jun-Trac Music BMI
Recorded at The Disc & United, Detroit & The 5th Floor, Cincinnati
Produced by Walter Morrison • Remixed by Arthur Baker
Original Sound Made by ZE Records © 1984

07 • ROSA YEMEN VS STIFF FIGURE • Herpes Simplex ReMix • 5:03
Written by Lizzy Mercier Descloux / Dj Banes    
Published by ZE Multimedia Music • Recorded at Blank Tapes NYC. 
Produced by Lizzy Mercier Descloux & Michel Esteban
Additional Recording & Mix by Stiff Figure
Remixed by Charlus de La Salle
Original Sound Made by ZE Records © 1978 / 2002

08 • TWITCH / OPTIMO • Contort Yourself ReMix • 6:53
Written by James Siegfried • Published by Copastatic
Recorded at Blank Tapes NYC • Originaly Produced by James Chance
Additional recording by Twich
Optimo ReMix Produced by Twich
Original Sound Made by ZE Records © 1979 & 2003

09 • WAS (NOT WAS) • The Party Broke Up Mutant Disco Edit • 3:12 
Written by David Was & Don Was 
Published by Los Was Cosmipolitanos / State of the Arless
Recorded & Mixed by the Detroit Wasmopolitan Mixinq Squad 
Duane Bradley, Ken Collier & Don Was  
Produced By Don Was & David Was
Recorded at Sound Suite Recording Studios, Detroit
Original Sound Made by ZE Records © 1982

10 • LIZZY MERCIER DESCLOUX • Hard-Boiled Babe Mutant Disco ReMix • 4:36
Written by Lizzy Mercier Descloux / Michel Bassignani    
Published by ZE Multimedia Music • Recorded at South Factory
Produced By Michel Esteban & Michel Bassignani
Remixed by Charlus de La Salle 2008

11 • ALAN VEGA • Fireball Mutant Disco Edit • 4:06
Written by Alan Vega. Published by Revega Music Inc ASCAP
Recorded at Skyline Studios, NYC 1980
Produced By Alan Vega
Original Sound Made by ZE Records © 1980

12 • GICHY DAN’S BEACHWOOD ≠ 9 • Action Man • 5:17 
Written by Ron Rogers
Produced by Ron Rogers
Original Sound Made by ZE Records © 1979

13 • GARÇONS • French Boy Filter Dub Mix • 6:32
Written by Vidal & Fitoussi
Remix by Disco Elements
Recorded at Blank Tape Studio NYC
Produced by Michel Esteban & Michael Zilkha
Original Sound Made by ZE Records © 1979

14 • MICHAEL DRACULA • Destroy Yourself CDLS ReMix • 4:38
Written by Emily McLaren • Published by ZE Multimedia Music
Recorded at South Factory Studio
Produced By Michel Esteban & Michel Bassignani
Remixed by Charlus de La Salle 2008
Original Sound Made by ZE Records © 2003


SOUND

THIS COMPITATION SELECTED AND PRODUCED BY MICHEL ESTEBAN
(p) & © ZE Records Mundo Ltda 2010
Very special thanks to Michael Zilkha 
Mastered by Charlus de la Salle at South Factory Studio


DESIGN

Art Cover from original work by Bruno-Cristian Tilley 
Booklet Desing by Michel Esteban

THE LAST DANCE

During the summer of 1977, a cortisone puffed up Elvis was about to join up with his twin brother Jesse Caron, who let him carry the way too heavy title of King of Rock & Roll. In the mean time, in a New York where an historical heat wave was intensified by the surrounding paranoid atmosphere set up by the son of Sam, Michael Zilkha and myself where about to form ZE Records, well-resolved to break down the boundaries between the two sounds that we both grew up with: Rock & Roll and Rhythm & Blues.

Michael and I were brought together by our common love for the Velvet Underground. John Cale, with whom I was working as DA for his new label « Spy Records », introduced us, as Michael wanted to invest in Spy’s capital. Ultimately, we created our own label, at a time were rock was starting to go round in circles and, where, despite hysterical campaigns such as « Disco Sucks » or « Death to Disco », the fun acts were to be found in the Clubs.

Ten years earlier in the East Village, Andy Warhol, who’s flair is once again to be saluted, already breached by turning into a club what was at the time a ballroom for polish immigrants, « The Dom », located on Saint Mark’s Place. He was then broadcasting his movies and light shows over the resident band, the now cult Velvet Underground with Nico, Eddie Sedgwick, the whole Factory crowd: artists, downtown Bohemians, uptown filthy richs, models, transvestites and junkies were gathering around Warhol’s Exploding Plastic Evitable Show. Things were stirring it up and this mix of genres was about to become a winner. John Wilcock was then writing in the East Village Other:

« Art has come to the discotheque and it will never be the same again. »

In April 1977, Steve Rubbel and Ian Schrager already started to popularize this idea with the opening of the Studio 54, soon followed in September by Michael Brody with the Paradise Garage. The year after, Fabrice Emaer would do the same in Paris opening Le Palace, with the success we all know. However, in the end of 1977, a breaker called « Saturday Night Fever » was about to rush in New Yorkers’ screens, and about to shatter forever the nightlife of every single cities of our small planet. Within a few months, what was an underground trend predominantly bound to blacks, gays and a few hundreds hype socialites packed in front of the Studio 54, Paradise Garage or Xenon (for those drove back from the 54), was about to become a social and cultural phenomenon.

Much like the suburban kids, second generation of Brooklyn immigrants taking Manhattan by storm, blow-dried and rigged out with polyester shirts made of the living-room curtains, millions of working class heroes were about to establish Disco as an worldwide economic model for the following 30 years…

In 1978 and 1979, ZE Records released its first 12” singles and Lps; from « No Wave » with James Chance/White, Arto Lindsay, Mars, Lizzy Mercier Descloux or Lydia Lunch, to the birth of Electro with bands such as Suicide, or even « Mutant Disco » with Kid Creole, Don Armando, Aural Exciters, Gichy Dan Beachwood ≠ 9, Junie Morisson and Was (Not Was). Some kind of timeless Disco that we would describe as « Mutant » for our first vinyl compilation, back in 1981. August Darnell has been the first one to carry through this crossover ambition between Rock and Disco, with the now cult ReMix of James White’s « Contort Yourself ». Pseudo-brothers David and Don Was would add to their band the MC5 guitarist: Wayne Kramer, Charlie Mingus’ trumpet player: Marcus Belgrave, and Parliament/funkadelic’s percussionist Larry Fratangelo; standardizing thereby a musical pattern for generations of bands who’d then pleased dance floors around the world.

30 years after the release of the first vinyl inaugurating what we can now qualify a new « style ». The Mutant Disco, not really mainstream disco music, but like we subtitled it on the original album: « A subtle discolation of the norm », I can prounly said that all these titles which did not take a wrinkle, since inspired several generations of future wannabe behind their turntable or in their studios and made contorsionner thousands of clubbers on the dancefloors of the whole world. It was, even if we did not realy though about it at that time, certainly the goal!

Therefore, here is the fourth volume of the series, in a way, to come full circle with the Mutant Disco on ZE Records. 

In this latest opus, one can discover a ReMix version (Let’s go to bed) of Was Not Was’ « Shake your head», with Ozzy Osbourne and the lovely Kim Bassinger on the microphone; and a ReMix of the delirious « The Party Brooke Up », two tracks from their second album « Born to Laugh at Tornadoes ». An Optimo ReMix by Twitch – one of today’s best Dj – of the cult classic « Contort Yourself » by James White & The Blacks. Another ReMix by Australian’s Stiff Figure of the rather minimal « Herpes Simplex » by Rosa Yemen, Lizzy Mercier Descloux’s first musical incarnation from 1978. « No Turn On Red » by David Gamson, a future member of Scritty Politti never made it onto an official release on ZE, its only appearance as a cassette-only release on the second of NME’s influential early ’80s ‘Jive Wire’ compilations. Here is the Fat Camp Edit version from Paul Noble and Bill Brewster. There’s also an Arthur Baker legendary ReMix of « Tease Me » by the nonetheless legendary Funkadelic member Junie Morisson, of whom we are reissuing the 1984 debut album on ZE: « Evacuate Your Seat » later this year. On the rocker side, we have a mix of Alan Vega’s « Fireball » out of his debut album on ZE and « Action Man » by Gichy Dan’s Beachwood ≠9, of who we will also reissue the debut album this year. A ReMix by San Francisco based band TUSSLE, of Irving Berlin classic « I’m an Indian Too », on its Don Armando 2nd Av. Rhumba Band’s version (while their album « Deputy of Love » is also to be reissued on ZE in 2010). A Mutant Disco ReMix of Lizzy Mercier Descloux’s last track in 2003 « Hard-Boiled Babe ». Last a ReMix of Michael Dracula’s track « Destroy Yourself », originally recorded for their debut album on ZE,« In The Red ».

In 2010, Club Culture has never been so prolific, and will be standing for many years to come. We’re proud to have set a few trails in this direction, and thus, to have brought our contribution to it.

Michel Esteban Bahia, October 2009

 

LINER NOTES (FRENCH)

LA DERNIERE DANSE

Durant l'été 1977 à Memphis, Elvis bouffi à la cortisone allait rejoindre son jumeau Jesse Caron qui lui avait laissé seul porter le titre trop lourd de roi du Rock & Roll. Pendant qu'à New York qui connaît alors une canicule historique accentuée par la parano ambiante que fait régner le fils de Sam, Michael Zilkha et moi-même nous apprêtions à fonder ZE records bien décider à faire tomber les barrières entre les deux musiques qui avaient bercé notre adolescence : Le Rock et le Rhythm & Blues.

C’était notre amour du Velvet Underground qui nous avait rapprochés, Michael et moi.  John Cale avec qui je travaillais comme directeur artistique sur son nouveau label « Spy Records », nous avait présentés, car Michael voulait rentrer dans le capital de Spy. En fin de compte, nous avons lancé tous les deux, notre propre label ZE records. A cette époque le Rock tournait un peu en rond et malgré les hystériques campagnes « Disco Sucks » ou « Death to Disco », le fun, c’était bien dans les discothèques qu’on allait le trouver...

Dix ans plutôt, dans l’east Village, Andy Warhol, dont il faut une nouvelle fois saluer le flair, avait ouvert la brèche en transformant en Club le premier étage d’une salle de bal pour immigrés Polonais, « The Dom », situé sur Saint Mark’s Place. Projetant ses films et light shows sur le groupe qui animait les soirées, le désormais cultissime Velvel Underground avec Nico, Eddie Sedgwick, toute la faune de la Factory, artistes, downtown Bohemians et Uptown friqués, top models, travestis et junkies se réunissaient autour de l’ Exploding Plastic Evitable Show Warholien. La mayonnaise avait pris et ce mélange des genres allait faire recette. John Wilcock écrivait alors dans The East Village Other: 

« Art has come to the discotheque and it will never be the same again. » 

En avril 1977, Steve Rubbel et Ian Schrager avaient commencé à populariser ce concept en ouvrant le Studio 54, suivi par Michael Brody en septembre avec le Paradise Garage. L’année suivante Fabrice Emaer fera de même à Paris avec le Palace, avec le succès que l’on sait. Mais à la fin de l’année 77 une déferlante nommée « Saturday Night Fever » allait débarquer sur les écrans New Yorkais et bouleverser à tout jamais la vie nocturne de toutes les grandes villes de notre petite planète.  En l’espace de quelques mois, ce qui n’était qu’un mouvement underground réservé principalement aux noirs, aux gays et à quelques centaines de socialites branchées qui se bousculaient aux portes des : Studio 54, Paradise Garage ou Xenon (pour les refoulés du 54),  allait devenir un phénomène de société.

A l’image des banlieusards de Brooklyn brushingnés et accoutrés de chemises polyester taillées dans les rideaux du salon, à l'assaut de Manhattan, des millions de working class heroes allaient propulser la disco en modèle économique mondial pour les trente années à venir ....

En 1978 et 79 sortiront les premiers maxis et albums sur ZE records : de la « No Wave » avec James Chance / White, Arto Lindsay, Mars, Lizzy Mercier Descloux et Lydia Lunch, les début de l’électro avec Suicide et de la « Disco » avec Kid Creole, Don Armando, Aural Exciters, Gichi Dan, et Was (Not Was). Disco que nous qualifierons de « Mutant » sur notre première compilation en 1981. August Darnell sera le premier à faire faire le cross over entre Rock et Disco avec son remix désormais classique de « Contort Yourself » de James White.  Les faux frères David et Don Was eux allieront au sein de leur groupe le guitariste de MC5 : Wayne Kramer, Marcus Belgrave : le trompettiste de Charlie Mingus et Larry Fratangelo : le percussionniste de Parliament/ Funkadelic, standardisant ainsi un modèle étalon pour des générations de groupes qui font aujourd’hui le bonheur des Dance floors de la planète.

30 ans après la parution du premier vinyle inaugurant ce qu'on peut désormais qualifier de « style ». Le Mutant Disco, pas vraiment de la disco classique, mais comme nous l'avions sous-titré sur cet album original : « A subtle discolation of the norm », que l'on pourrait traduire par : Une subtile dislocation de la norme...  tous ces titres qui n'ont pas pris une ride, ont depuis inspiré plusieurs générations de futur wannabe derrière leurs platines ou dans leurs studios et fait se contorsionner des milliers de clubbers sur les pistes du monde entier. C'était, même si nous n'y pensions pas vraiment à l'époque, certainement le but !

Voici donc le quatrième volume de la série pour boucler la boucle des rééditions Mutant Disco sur ZE records.

Dans cette dernière livraison on peut trouver un Remix (Let's go to bed) de « Shake your Head » de Was (Not Was), avec Ozzy Osbourne et la délicieuse Kim Bassinger derrière le micro, ainsi qu'un Edit Remix du délirant « The Party Brooke Up », deux titres extraits de leur second album,  « Born to Laugh at Tornados ». Le Remix Optimo par Twitch, un des meilleurs dj actuel, du Cult Classic  « Contort Yourself » de James White & The Blacks. Un Remix par les australiens Stiff Figure du minimaliste « Herpex Simplex » de Rosa Yemen, la première incarnation (1978) discographique de Lizzy Mercier Descloux. « No Turn On Red » par David Gamson, futur membre de Scritty Politti n’avait jamais été publié sur un disque « officiel » ZE, le titre était juste sorti sur une cassette promo du magazine anglais NME. Vous trouverez ici sa version « Fat Camp Edit » par Paul Noble et Bill Brewster. Le Remix par le légendaire Arthur Baker du « Tease Me » de Junie Morrison, figure du non moins légendaire Funkadelic et dont nous rééditons pour l'occasion le premier album solo sur ZE en 1984 «  Evacuate Your Seats” . Une touche un peu plus « rock » avec l'Edit Mix de « Fireball » extrait du premier LP d'Alan Vega et du « Action Man » de Gichy Dan. Un Remix du groupe de San Francisco TUSSLE du classique d'Irving Berlin «  I'm an Indian Too », par Don Armando’s 2nd Av. Rhumba Band, dont nous rééditons également le premier album « Deputy of Love ». Un Remix de « Hard-Boiled Babe » le dernier morceau enregistré par Lizzy Mercier Descloux en 2003. Un remix des Garçons extrait de leur premier album « Divorce » enregistré par Bob Blank en 1979. Un Remix de Michael Dracula, « Destroy Yourself » extrait de son premier album « In The Red ».

En 2009 la Club Culture n'a jamais été aussi prolifique et a encore de beaux jours devant elle. Nous sommes fiers d'avoir ouvert quelques pistes et apporté notre petite pierre à cet édifice.

Michel Esteban 

Bahia,  Octobre 2009

Track List
  • 1
    Shake Your Head (Let's Go To Bed) - Was (Not Was) - ReMix
    05:30
  • 2
    I'm an Indian Too - Tussle VS Don Armando - Re-Deconstruction ReMix
    07:16
  • 3
    No Turn On Red - David Gramson - Fat Camp Version Edit
    05:48
  • 4
    Winter Of Love - Don Armando's 2nd Av. Rhumba Band
    06:18
  • 5
    Marathon Runner - Aural Exciters
    06:23
  • 6
    Tease Me - Junie Morrison - Arthur Baker ReMix Version
    07:01
  • 7
    Herpes Simplex - Stiff Figure VS Rosa Yemen - Re Edit Mix
    05:02
  • 8
    Contort Yourself - Optimo/Twitch - Optimo Re Edit Mix
    06:51
  • 9
    The Party Broke Up - Was (Not Was) - MixEdit
    03:10
  • 10
    Hard Boiled Babe - Lizzy Mercier Descloux - Mutant Disco ReMix
    04:35
  • 11
    Fireball - Alan Vega - MixEdit
    04:05
  • 12
    Action Man - Gichy Dan's Beachwood # 9
    05:17
  • 13
    French Boy - Garçons - Filter Dub Mix
    06:30
  • 14
    Destroy Yourself - Michael Dracula - CDLS ReMix
    04:38